8 simple rules for dating my teenage daughter

In 8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter, humorist W.Bruce Cameron takes us blow by blow, shriek by shriek through the process of raising teenagers, an experience he says is similar to "blunt force trauma." It's a survival guide written by a man who has lived among teenagers and has the credit card bills to prove it. And that’s why my wife just gave me that half-smile. And now that I’ve tried to change the way I look at love, the more I become shocked at the messages of love I had gotten when I was younger. And even when I let it out of my chest, it wasn’t love. Telling someone you love them doesn’t mean that you do.See all Product description Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App.

8 simple rules for dating my teenage daughter-368 simple rules for dating my teenage daughter-71

A comic survival guide to being a parent of teenage daughters, Bruce Cameron's book started life in 1995 as a wildly, and accidentally, successful Internet column.

Most of his other works revolve around dogs in one way or another, and are tops on my list.

I enjoyed reading it but it was just good, not great. Our daughter read it cover to cover quickly and seemed to like it, but refuses to admit it. It was written at the start of the cell phone era so the material relating to phone lines in the house and cell phones is very dated. Bruce Cameron depicts teenage girls to a T in this easy-to-read masterful description of modern adolescent life.

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I guess that’s why I told my wife I loved her on our second date. But it wasn’t that she wasn’t giving me love, it just seemed to come at different times. I don’t think I noticed this consciously for a while. And after each time, there would be this look she would give me. It wasn’t something I could force, just something that would come about as a result of my giving. And how much I’m sure those messages are bouncing around in other people’s heads as well. Living Disney movies in our minds, and tragedies in our lives.

In short, sharply observed vignettes, he touches a middle-aged-male nerve by describing the rage and bewilderment of having little girls turn into teenage monsters, but every complaint is punctured by a self-deprecating regular-guy-in-a-mad-world irony.

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